We Love the Sound of our own Voices

Time to rile folks up more.

We think Bartle was right, and said so in comments on the last post. But, lest ye frontpage-only folks never see our pithiness, here are some highlights, edited just a touch.

Quoth Tuebit:

Part of Bartle’s perspective is that of the game designer … they tend to see through the game to the mechanics … it detracts from the fun, I’ll bet. But he’s very aptly expressing the core of his argument in a way that ANY long-time player will (or should) understand. How many character can you level to 70 (or whatever the level cap of you game of choice)? And once you’ve done that … can you rush right into another game with all the enthusiasm you once had? Burnout!

No-one believes a game stays fresh forever.

Why is it any wonder that, for long time serial MMO players, the whole genre might begin to feel stale? Sure each new game may perfect (or perhaps just change) a few mechanics, but precious few have really excited me over the years. Frankly, I don’t understand why there’s any controversy. Bartle speaks the truth.

Quoth Tache:

I still think all AAA MMORPGs are cut from the same cloth. Graphics and minor fiddly mechanics aside, the core gameplay just isn’t different.

CoH: I logged in and repetitively ran missions. This was a way to mask the fact that really, I was being sent around to kill legions of stuff. The mobs I killed gave me money and enhancements (which are kind of like equipment) and xp. As I acquired xp, I made character advancement decisions (but without a completely free hand, as some “required” optimizations limited my character development path). Once I got a buttload of xp, I couldn’t get any more. At the end, all I could do was hellishly long grinds for money to make invention enhancements, or raid the Hamidon for hamidon enhancements to improve my character.

WoW: I logged in and repetitively ran missions. This was a way to mask the fact that really, I was being sent around to kill legions of stuff. Sometimes, this mask was “go to a place where you have to run by enemies that will attack.” Sometimes, this mask was “kill enemies that have a 10% drop rate, get 10 things without realizing you’re actually killing 100 enemies.” The mobs I killed, and the people I did missions for, gave me money and equipment and xp. As I acquired xp, I made character advancement decisions (but without a completely free hand, as some “required” optimizations limited my character development path). Once I got a buttload of xp, I couldn’t get any more. At the end, all I could do was hellishly long grinds for PvP honor to purchase battlefield epics, or raid places like Karazhan for epics and badges to improve my character.

SWG: I logged in and repetitively ran missions. This was a way to mask the fact that really, I was being sent around to kill legions of stuff. The mobs I killed and missions that I completed gave me money and equipment and xp. As I acquired xp, I made character advancement decisions (but without a completely free hand, as some “required” optimizations limited my character development path). Once I got a buttload of xp, I couldn’t get any more. At the end, all I could do was hellishly long grinds of specific easy mobs hoping for rare drops, or hellishly difficult raids on extremely difficult mobs and dungeons hoping for rare drops, or both combined with finding a truly expert crafter to craft a rare item. The item might be for my character, or for a house or player city.

About Tachevert

A cofounder of www.WorldIV.com and full-time geek, Tachevert writes about whatever strikes his fancy. Despite the inherent contradiction, he can often be found videogaming or attempting to run.
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